GBIS741 Term Project - 90 points

Initial Reading

  1. Read the Mountain View Community Hospital Case at the end of Chapter 1 (Page 35 in the Ninth Edition. Different page number in prior editions.)
  2. Read the Mountain View Community Hospital Case at the end of Chapter 2 (Page 80)
  3. Read the Mountain View Community Hospital Case at the end of Chapter 3 (Page 148)
  4. Read the Mountain View Community Hospital Case at the end of Chapter 4 (Page 196)

Project 1a - Due November 23 (no late penalty until November 29)

  1. Develop a detailed Enhanced Entity-Relationship (EER) diagram and Business Rules for the Mountain View Community Hospital case study that you read in the Initial Reading.
  2. Follow the level of details explained in Chapter 4.
  3. Use Visio
  4. Hint: You may be able to use many of the Business Rules described in the Case at the end of Chapter 3.
  5. Hint: It can be helpful to think about the Case Questions and Case Exercises in all parts of the Initial Reading.

Project 1b - Due November 30 (no late penalty until December 6)

  1. Develop a detailed relational schema for the Mountain View Community Hospital case study as described after Chapter 5
  2. All relations in your design should at least be in third normal form (3NF).
  3. Map the EER diagram you developed in Project 1a to a relational schema using techniques described in Chapter 5. Be sure to specify all primary keys and include all necessary foreign keys.
  4. Use Visio. You may want to use a copy of the diagram you submitted in Project 1a as a base and then modify it.

Project 1c - December 7 (no late penalty until December 13)

  1. Develop SQL code that would create the database files corresponding to you relational schema for the Mountain View Community Hospital created in Project 1b.
  2. See the Mountain View Community Hospital case study as described after Chapter 7.
  3. Make sure when you write the SQL statements that create the tables that you specify data types, field lengths, primary keys and foreign keys.
  4. Select at least two of your tables that are related to each other and populate those tables with at at least three rows each.
  5. Write a SELECT * query for each table that you populated.
  6. Write one query that selects some but not all of the rows in one of your populated tables, run it and show the results.
  7. Write one query that joins two tables that you populated and shows at least one row.
  8. Hint: You might want to use PHPAdmin to create the tables to avoid some of the clerical work in developing the CREATE TABLE statements. You can then add any SQL that you could not easily generate in PHPAdmin.